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Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
but that is very focused and it's a great teaching and i love this environment. i have colleagues as a great man on economics and a lot of other colleagues and disciplines and they really deserve a shot. she is one of a global leader in documenting and researching but also working practically on the human trafficking. president laws of the clinton global the initiative announcing a major new direction on this topic and there are many people that work on this topic to have helped move it forward on the agenda but one of them as a lot of credit. >> we've been talking with philip auerswald, the coming prosperity, entrepreneurs are transforming the global economy. his most recent book. book tv on location at george mason university. >>> now on book tv, alex berezow argues that while antiscience is usually a term associated with conservatives, the left in the united states has plenty of problems with science when it comes to issues they don't support. it's about an hour and a half. >> my name is kenneth agreement and a resident scholar here at the enterprise institute and i work on primarily energy a
-intentioned authoritarian leaders because they raileesed to survive in that environment you have to succumb to that environment. you have to assimilate into that environment. so, the system in syria is very inert in that sense and was much more difficult to overcome, obviously, and perhaps he didn't have the -- where with annual and ability to take on the real forces in syria who are status quo forces and against any change that might undermine the foundation of their rule and situation. >> the situp in syria by the colonial powers was france was working with a shiite sect, which is a minority, who were to look after the sunnies, who are the majority. 10% or shias of another sect. assad belongs to this sect ands the military is from this sect and the elite are from this sect. correct? >> partial limit he would not be able to rule if it was only them in the inner circle. >> they basically in control. >> they're dominant in the military apparatus but they have also done a very good job, started under his father. of coe opting many sunnies, christians in particular and others, into the apparat
from his patronage. that environment created an atmosphere as well and which the islamic opposition take greater group and was essentially cards become more and more virulent. the number of events which because of our lack of understanding of what was going on in libyan would in retrospect signal, you know, to people who are watching this that things are not going well. essentially the people work getting increasingly frustrated with qaddafi and had the potential to the explode. you had the -- another event, the massacre in 1996 in which 120050 people were killed. this was by -- under the supervision allegedly of the head of internal intelligence. this was a very important thing because the victims of that massacre were primarily political prisoners and from the eastern part of the country. the east, you know, in a very tightly knit tribal society, this act of that magnitude basically created a cascading resentment which came to the haunted qaddafi basically. this was -- that was a major event in creating resentment against the regime. by 1997 benghazi was essentially in a state of
, this is weaker. and we want to see in a changing environment, who will be the winners and to be the losers? >> if climate changes and a slowdown, the sea will be twice as acidic as it was before the industrial age. the smallest to largest will be affected. and the ocean as we know it will be a very different place. >> jerry anderson, the creator of thunderbirds has died. >> 3, 2, 1. >> science fiction series first aired in 1965 with a use of the country. that followed the avengers of the international rescue using spacecraft and a range of vehicles. he suffered from alzheimer's disease since 2010. he died in his sleep at age 83. two bear cubs have been given a second chance after they were rescued by forest rangers. >> their mother was apparently killed, which means they were killed, which means they were all
. the rights environment i think you could argue was, you know, could go both ways. there was new language added about nondiscrimination, about protection of minorities, equality, but there were a lot of caveats like as prescribed by law that were kind of these catchalls that again opened the door to future abuse or limits on citizenship or on citizen rights. >> so rights were articulated but not guaranteed? >> rights were articulated but not guaranteed, and actually open to constraint and to limitations through future legislation. overall, the system didn't change dramatically. you still had a very highly centralized form of government, still very, very presidential, although it is theoretically a mixed system. it still leaves most of the power in the president's hands. and so in terms of the structure of government institutions and checks and balances, there hasn't been a whole lot new introduced. in terms of the process, i think this is where it has taken a bad situation, ordinary controversies, what might have been considered ordinary controversies, and actually made the situation much
on the airplane and it's a positive impact on safety. schools are a sensitive environment as well. you could provide safety and security with armed, trained, personnel without putting fear in everyone. >> he argued since timothy mcveigh used fertilizer to kill men, women and children in oklahoma city, restricting firearms will not make children safer but many lawmakers are skeptical about the nra plan. >> we have armed officers in many schools in washington, d.c. we have armed officers in schools. and some of that is appropriate and perhaps we can do more. it actually doesn't cost $8 billion. we have 130,000 elementary and secondary schools in the country. if you had two officers in each, that would cost $25 billion. where is that money going to come from? >> friday. nra c.e.o. said the only thing that stops a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun. he explained parents will feel safer dropping kids off at school after the holidays if there's an armed police officer standing guard over their child's classroom. >> lots of folks on both sides of this. peter, thank you so much. >>> in the
that was happening in the area. a number of different things in environment that we had no idea. later, many kids in my neighborhood, i worked at the plant myself. got a sense of what it's like to be on the inside of the plant. there was one evening when i came home, from work at rocky flats, and turned on the television and it was a show on "nightline" that it was an exposÉ of what was really happening at the plant. and it was the first time that a really have an awareness, really have an understanding of what was happening at rocky flats and how extent -- extraordinary the contamination was but it was on that day i decided to quit my job at rocky flats come at the day i decided i would write a book about it. it took me about 10 years of research and writing to pull the story together. and i wanted to write a book that reads like a novel, but is very heavily footnoted come everything in the book is factual. so you can check back and see where the information comes from. but i wanted to write this story from the perspective of all of the different kinds of people whose lives have been affected b
not think it logical that we protect the children of our nation in a school environment. it can be gun consistent with their learning atmosphere and that's my challenge to bring experts together to accomplish that. >> you were part of the news conference on friday. i want to play you a little bit of what wayne lapierre had to say there. >> the truth is that our society is populated by an unknown number of genuine monsters. people that are so deranged, so evil, so possessed by voices and driven by demons that no sane person can ever possibly comprehend them. >> of course he's the executive vice president of the nra. i have to ask you, when you listen to that sound bite, the question that rings in my head is whether he just arctic you could y arctic could you lawsuited a good reason for gun control as opposed to against gun control. what's your view? >> i think you have to put guns in the hands of the right people. for example, hunters obviously have a need for their own weapons. and there's rec accurareational and so on. but we want to protect our airplanes, our passenger and we've done
an environment there was spirit and was spun by the development of late george w. norris who came to nebraska and fought for the unicameral legislature and nonpartisan. some people say he did it because he wanted to save money. i am sure it saves money to have one house, but the main reason he did it is to get rid of the conference committees that we go through the back here that are a puzzle. i was at a conference committee on the football field and bate changes five times before they blow the whistle. so what we have in nebraska is something that is officially nonpartisan and looks nonpartisan, so that is a backdrop for me. so when i come here in a partisan environment, i said i don't have to subscribe to partisan environment. mauney goal and my team as the governor is to run nebraska, not republican or democratic or east or west urban, i represent all the people even those that voted against me. i've taken that approach back here to represent all the people, not just other people. >> did you ever think about becoming an independent? >> the democratic party never pushed it out to greet you
of the majority of republicans. his own republicans in a house. that is tricky about the current environment. dennis: his party left him hanging last time around on that plan b. if we go over the cliff and don't get a deal by january 1st, can't they get a deal week or two later? is not the end of the world. >> absolutely right those things get very hard. making a fix to the alternative minimum tax which will hit millions of americans at the end of the year unless something is done, retrofitting that will be difficult. it will be hard to get over the market's psychological impact of going over the cliff even briefly. one of the interesting things is the markets have been very blase about this. they think something will happen in the last few days of the year. if that doesn't happen there will be a psychological jolt because expectations will not have been met. that won't be a good thing but washington be in washington you can retrofit any solution and walk it back to the first of the year even a couple weeks into the year. dennis: a little bit of hope. thank you. shibani: starbucks taking of
of the hysteria that created the environment for roe vs wade, using jane roe, who later recanted and said he she didn't want an abortion and misleading statistics, somehow abortion would be good for our children and we've seen millions of children lost to the united states and millions a year. and ireland could say their protection of human right is something to fight for. and they have cases they brought before the european court and some were thrown out, false cases again trying to manufacture facts, trick people, mislead people and happening again in ireland. i think right now the lesson is clear, don't go the way of the misleading abortion industry trying to make a profit off of the pain of women and hurt women and children, and stand for human rights like you've done and america looks to you as a inspiration point and reinstitute the right to life in our own nation. [applause] >> i'm told by many liberals this is the most important thing that a woman in america and woman in ireland wants is the right to have an abortion. now, both of you are young women and neither of you feel the most imp
events like the one in newtown. first, the psychologist of the killer. second, the environment of violence in our culture. third, the easy access to guns. each of these might explain any single event, but what we should be trying to understand is not one single event, but why we have so many of them. let's look at the facts. according to the u.n.'s office on drugs and crime, the u.s. gun homicide rate is 30 times that of france or australia. it is 12 times higher than the average for other developed countries. why is that? if psychology is the main course, we should see that we have 12 times as many psychologically disturbed people as the average. we don't. in fact, america takes mental disorders seriously, treats them and doesn't stigmatize them. we do better in this area than most of our peers. is america's popular culture much worse than other rich countries? not really since it's largely the same popular culture worldwide. england and wales are exposed to cultural influences as the u.s. yet, their rate of gun homicide is some 3% of ours. the japanese are at the cutting edge
. they're out in the street. if they come here, it's a real nice environment for them. >> everybody get into the ring. we'll have the wrap session. >> this week ip to talk about unity. in this gym we are a community. >> we not only do boxing but youth development. when you walk in the door, weert not only teaching you boxing. we're also teaching you that you have to go to school. we have three or four tutors that are trying to get these kids' grades up. i used to have average like b, cs. now i get as and bs. i joined boxing to stay away from the streets and to get my life together. it literally saved my life boxing. i want these kids to go to college for the next generation. it could be more powerful in life. we're more than just tough. we're also smart. i want to become a champion, and i want to show people that this neighborhood is not only about violence. that there's people in here in the neighborhood that are determined to become somebody in life. p if i help two, three kids a year, that's already a difference. just like boxing saved me, i'm trying to save others. >> we're giving i
-show host bill bennett. and a look ahead at the political environment in 23,
made the trains run on time. that was the environment that i grew up in and i felt very comfortable when bill i asked me to finish the book. again, silly me, i thought i can do this. whether it was hubris or not -- >> what do you think he saw i knew that he had not seen in any of the other possible writers? >> we did talk about that. he told me once -- he said, try to find someone. he said, this is like a mother giving away her children to be raised by another. i would say, bill. he would say, nice try, but no. he said "if i wanted anyone, and i do not, i would want a writer." later, when he last, he said "paul, you have written 500, 600 feature stories. that is where i started." he saw the journalists as having the same tools as the historian when it comes to sourcing. when all of that is assembled, tell a story that would pass the campfire test, i call it, a bunch of folks sitting around a campfire. and i guess he liked my stories. >> so, if you had to pick out of this book your favorite story, what would they be? >> i enjoyed his battles over the american second front and when to
have as i mentioned the stable environments to attract the foreign investments, yes. we will work together. we will produce. we exert more efforts in order to develop, in order to find the solution for our economical crisis. >> warner: waleed el haddad, thank you for joining us. you can watch all of our monday interview with opposition leader mohammed el-baradei. find a link on our home page. >> ifill: now, a second look at a science story that captured headlines this year. the federal government has taken new steps to limit some of the research it does with chimpanzees, which have long been the source of hope and debate. but questions remain about whether those experiments should occur under any circumstances. "newshour" science correspondent miles o'brien reports. >> reporter: there are no other animals quite like them, except us. they share 99% of our d.n.a. and it shows. they scheme, plot and fight. they care for their babies and they grieve their dead. and they love a good game of catch. as i discovered, queenie had little patience for my wild pitches. >> did you see her stom
. this is the environment right now. it is a holiday but we will watch each sector under pressure. lori: more news then redo this time. tracy: fiscal clef finger-pointing underway in washington. harry reid says they're headed over the cliff. it is really about senator harry reid and mitch mcconnell? >> to develop the political staring contest democrats say republicans need to move and around rego. the president arrived this morning from hawaii and so with the top democrats and republicans but still no update to report. senate majority leader harry reid said it looks like we're going over a cliff and it is up to the house. >> speaker boner shed call people back to washington today and should not have let them go. they are not here. john boner cared more about his speakership than the financial footing. >> they're now working on a fiscal clear solutions they say the majority leader should talk less and legislate more. also mitch mcconnell says the leader is happy to review with the president what he has in mind but that a majority has not put forward a plan. when they do members will review legislation to mak
to be for this year. that creates an environment of complete uncertainty. they have people rushing to buy gold, silver, in some of these other commodities. i think the star with term-limit thing politicians so that once they do get elected, they handle our business. you and i and everyone else, we have budgets. we have to balance our budget. fifth we cannot spend more than we take in. if we do we run into issues. i think the same principle should apply it to the country and wish to get the house in order before we start slipping into second world status and which are having issues with some of the other countries. host: here is say tweet -- here is a story in "the hill." trisha is on the line from indiana, a democrat. caller: i am very glad to talk to you. happy holidays to everybody. i just had a comment on the fiscal of debate and have a look to us in the future. i really think that the gentlemen, i think he was from virginia, had a good point about term limits. there are politicians of both sides that are making a life career out of being a politician instead of getting elected to serve the people
as you mentioned and the continuity that left those americans in beyond hostile environment, ultimately dead. answer that question you are asking yourself. why do you think repeated requests for additional security were not heeded? >> i believe that the answer to that question is political one. the administration wanted to sell the american people on a narrative that was false. that is, this was a victory for us in libya. everything is normal. there is no problem. we've got al-qaeda on the run. finally president obama himself had to take that line out of his stump speech because we didn't have al-qaeda on the run. they are clearly there all over the place. so the narrative was, libya is completely normal. if they spring the money for more security or if they send more assets over there, then it's an admission, maybe libya is not as successful that we want to tell the american people. that is why susan rice was rolled out there to five network shows to say this was a video, it was a spontaneous protest. as biden said malarkey in another context but it was not right to tell the american p
it for the environment. in part. elizabeth prann is live with more. tell us about the tree elves. can you call them this. >> reporter: we can, they are giving families one less thing to worry about this holiday season, these brothers are known as the kick of pop in the smerp months and sell popular frozen popcicles across atlanta and this southeast end and, now are delivering small, medium or large trees with or without lights and after that pick up the tree and donate them to parks, schools and churches and if you want to you can keep it. customers say it has been a weight lifted off their shoulders during the holiday season and it is eco-friendly, too. >> makes us feel good to support a local business such as the tree elves. rather than go and cut one down or go to home depot and purchase one like we have done in the past. we legislative the idea of supporting tree elves be a supporting king of pops, which we're a big fan of, getting a tree that is sustainable and will be replanted. >> reporter: they have 200 trees and sold out almost immediately and next year will have more trees and more varieties.
, natural sound in quiet and noisy environments because of how it works with your ear's own anatomy. can your hearing aid do all this? lyric can. to learn more about lyric's advanced technology, call 1-800-511-3035 or visit trylyric.com for a risk-free 30 day trial offer and free dvd and brochure. get the hearing aid that can. lyric from phonak. lyric can. >>> it's boxing day in the uk and canada and several other countries. fitting name, right? like black friday in the united states. retailers cut their prices hoping to entice shoppers to look for a good deal willing to spend their holiday cash. they're just running. analysts expect that british shoppers spend almost $5 billion today. in the u.s. not good news for retailers. early figures show it's the worst holiday sales performance in three years. alison kosik is at the new york stock exchange. why so bad this year? >> first of all, the fiscal cliff issues were hanging on shoppers' minds. that's one reason. you know, you look at whether or not the after christmas shopping will help. it will in some ways. in many ways, though, people a
was a generation ago. it was a very different political environment. i mean, as we saw last week, house republicans are not really inclined to compromise on their core principles, which are keeping taxes low and the second amendment. so i think eleanor's right. the only way you can maybe get something passed is to pair it with, you know, other options that they would agree to. they'd say, okay, we're going to get more, you know, mental health resources to prevent this from happening again. and okay maybe we'll agree to some limits on guns. you know, related to that, i would point out that the nra's latest proposal would cost $7 billion according to my back of the envelope calculations. >> you mean to put police officers in every school? >> yeah. you've got 100,000 public schools. right now you have about a third of them that have armed security guards of one kind or another. so that means you've got two-thirds, 70,000, costs about $100,000 to pay a salary and benefits for a police officer so, that comes out to $7 billion. to put that in perspective, the fbi's annual budget is $8 billion. now, i don
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)